Creamfields 2016 archive in Focus.

To Document Stories Is One Thing, But It’s Nothing If You Are Unable To Share It.

Hardeep Singh Creamfields Best Major Festival Daresbury England GB, August 2016. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Creamfields Best Major Festival Daresbury England GB, August 2016. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

In the midst of Covid 19 pandemic I am busy and has begun organising my extensive photo archive at Harry Clicks London. I am doing those jobs that always get Paused back I was too busy with day job and other commitments.

I was inspired to move from Canon 100d with 18 -55mm to Canon 70d 24-70mm f2.8 in the early year 2016. when I was taking these photos , I had no idea what I going to use these picture. I found myself Obsessive Compulsive Photography Disorder (OCPD). I was suffering from Gear Acquisition Syndrome, falling into the trap of thinking that buying a new lens. I was on Auto mode when I stared my photography.

The Creamfields is my home for August Bank Holidays weekend since 2013. It’s annual Dance temple visit and It always will be.

Hardeep Singh Creamfields Best Major Festival Daresbury England GB, August 2016. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Creamfields Best Major Festival Daresbury England GB, August 2016. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

The Creamfields to me, is my church, it’s my temple, it’s my synagogue, it’s my mosque. it’s where I feel the most spiritual. it’s where I go for my enjoyment, it’s where I go to work, where I go to meet new friends and where I go to think. And it’s also the environment that challenges me more the any other environment that I know.

the real challenge when you’re presented with an amazing Happy raver like this creamfields. is to be able to take something home with you that correctly captures the mood and the experience of really being there.

I have traces the technical development of my own practice through the Dance Festival I has photographed. Hardeep Singh

 

 

 

 

5 reasons why you should get beach therapy

There is something about a beach vacation that leaves you blissfully relaxed, happy and rejuvenated. It works for people across ages. From the freshness of a sunrise, the frolicking waves of the day, the self-awareness during a sunset or the calm during the night, the beach changes our mood and puts you in touch with your inner self. Most people have at least, once, contemplated on having a house near a beach. If you’ve stayed away from the beach for too long, here are 5 reasons you should come over to get some beach therapy.

Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay Wales GB Aug 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

1. The beach keeps you healthy
There are direct benefits to being at the beach not only because there is Vitamin Sea but also Vitamin D. Most people who work in offices hardly get to catch the sun at the right time to synthesize natural Vitamin D. Your days at the beach catching the morning sun can help make up for some of that deficiency. Don’t forget that sunscreen if you plan to stay longer though.

2. Out of the spa and into the ocean
From algae to sea salts and even sea weeds, luxury spas offer an exotic mix of natural ingredients that help rejuvenate your skin. But why go to a spa when you can get it all directly at the beach! A simple dip in the ocean will also have a rejuvenating effect on your skin. And the best part is that you don’t need to pay thousands of dollars for it!

3. It helps you leave stress behind
“There is some comfort in the emptiness of the sea. No past. No future.” – The Last Samurai.
In a way, when you stare at the endless waves, it offers you to seek the stillness of your mind. It allows you to remove the worry and focus towards the solution. We all face challenges in life which sometimes seems insurmountable It’s no wonder that you can spend an entire evening at the beach watching the waves and feel calm and happy.

4. You can exercise freely
Beach has the perfect concoction for exercise. There’s a great view which puts you in a good mood. There is no jostling for space. There is no news repeating in cycles or thumping music. Instead there is sand which makes your workout better. And even the post workout casual swim helps burn calories. Yoga at the beach allows you to concentrate towards unifying body, mind and soul and feeling in harmony with the universe.

5. The beach makes you happy
Scientists believe that the amniotic fluid in the womb is our first and deep connection with water. Our body itself is 70% water. Water is a part of us and helps us survive and thrive. Our deep connection with water allows us to be subconsciously happy around water bodies. The sound waves, blue waters and white sand offer a soothing backdrop of colours and sound that help us calm our mind. The openness of the beach provides a sense of safety, not having hidden threats. The fact that you can unplug and connect with nature is another reason that makes us happy. What’s not to love!

 

 

 

 

My Equipment List

I love tools just as much as any photographer. However, without an artist and the creative process, tools are just tools. Yes, I want to purchase the best tools I can afford, and it is often true, you get what you pay for. However, most of us have a limited budget, and we have to be wise in purchasing the right tools. Don’t be swayed by thinking that to create amazing images you have to have all the bells and whistles. You can rock the world with one camera, one lens and one light. The bottom line is just get out and create!

Cameras

Canon EOS-1D X Mark II

Canon EOS-1D X Mark II
Canon EOS-1D X Mark II

Canon EOS 70D

Canon EOS 70D hARRY Clicks
                                                          Canon EOS 70D

Canon EOS M5

 

Canon EOS M5
                                         Canon EOS M5

Lenses

EOS M5 Lenses

Canon 24-70 mm 2.8 II Lens

Canon 70-200mm 2.8 II Lens

Canon 50 mm 1.8 Lens

Canon 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 Lens

Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens

Sigma 150-600 f/5.6 Lens

Tripod & Accessories
the right tripod and you can have it for life. If you watch my behind the scenes, 99% of the time I am shooting on a tripod. The sturdier the platform the sharper the image.

Canon Extender EF 1.4x III

Canon Extender EF 2x III

Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT

 

 

Hardeep Singh In Wales

As part of Covid 19 Lockdown photography is restricted. Staying indoor currently working a selection of images made in Wales over the last four and a half years by me . The photographer was drawn to the country in part my ongoing fascination with documenting the people of the British Isles at leisure, but also covered Wales’ wildlife and Imperial college London union societies wales summer and winter tours.

The first photo I ever took was a travel photo, I was 12 and I was on my first big trip pilgrimage 300 Sala Khalsa Sirjana Diwas 14 April 1999 in India. I remember that moment when I took that picture as though it were yesterday.

The click of the shutter, must have made a deep impression. Ever from that early age I saw this fantastic connection between travel and photography.

Hardeep Singh Newgale beach Pembrokeshire "Enormous! is the only way to describe this beach; it’s almost 2 miles of sand backed by a huge pebble bank formed after a BIG storm in 1859." Wales GB July 2018. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Newgale beach Pembrokeshire “Enormous! is the only way to describe this beach; it’s almost 2 miles of sand backed by a huge pebble bank formed after a BIG storm in 1859.” Wales GB July 2018. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

I usually have two reasons for shooting, the most reason is that I shoot what’s called stock photography, which mean I can shoot any subject, any where at same time. Hardeep Singh

Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay has 3 miles of gorgeous sand and coastline. Perfect for walkers, water sports and wonderful views Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay has 3 miles of gorgeous sand and coastline. Perfect for walkers, water sports and wonderful views Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

This project is not about Wales. the images that make up its whole were not created in an attempt to capture the personality of the nation. They are not a concerted excavation of a specific communal identity. These images are not the result of a photographer going in search of something, but rather a document of what I saw as me passed through Wales on another journey entirely.

Hardeep Singh Port Eynon located on the far south tip of the Gower Peninsula within the designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Imperial College London Surf club members checking waves. Wales GB March 2014. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Port Eynon located on the far south tip of the Gower Peninsula within the designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Imperial College London Surf club members checking waves. Wales GB March 2014. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

That journey, of course, is own by Hardeep Singh; the gradual deepening and tuning of my aesthetic tendencies and instincts, mapped here over the 7 years across the beaches, shows, valleys, wildlife and peoples of Wales. Looking through the images for this introduction it’s difficult not to feel that the character more often explored in their captured moments is that of the observer than the observed; Wales as a mirror, reflecting the inscape of me more than the inscape of the nation.

Hardeep Singh Newgale beach Pembrokeshire Wales GB Sep 2017. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Newgale beach Pembrokeshire Wales GB Sep 2017. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Tourist in Skomer Island Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Tourist in Skomer Island Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

Skomer Island Wales is a once in life time sighing and this is what I live for as Photographer. Hardeep Singh

Hardeep Singh Dale Sea Safaris Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Dale Sea Safaris Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

The myriad of activities to carputer throughout Wales has been a major reason for me finds myself returning years after years. I always had the ability to feel comfortable wherever, I am, I do my best to blend in. at a really simple level, travel photography provides a visual record of place visited. But at its best, it can provide an insight to the world at large and all its diversity.

Hardeep Singh The Imperial College London Outdoor Club Summer Trip to Rhossili Bay beach Wales GB Oct 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh The Imperial College London Outdoor Club Summer Trip to Rhossili Bay beach Wales GB Oct 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

So what are the qualities of gaze that can illicit such a response, such an instant recall of images to the moment? At the heart there is nearly always the communal patterns of leisure, and more specifically a study of the ephemeral unguarded moment within the context of holiday, hobby, time off or event. This is what seems to draw my eye again and again – how do we behave, move, celebrate and look when freed from the constraints of work and schedule into the looser, but still often socially prescriptive, rhythms of organised relaxation? This is why the bank holiday weekend, the new year’s eve party, the beach, the beauty spot, the municipal pool or park have always been such fertile territory for me. These are the places that draw the holidaying herd, where I can observe the individual and the crowd at once; where I can be apart yet close enough to record the joys and pathos of what we do with time and each other when both, briefly, are offered to us as our own.

Hardeep Singh Fellwanderers: The Imperial College London Hiking Club Summer tour to Snowdonia Wales GB Sep 2016. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Fellwanderers: The Imperial College London Hiking Club Summer tour to Snowdonia Wales GB Sep 2016. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

Although expressive, these moments are rarely given expression. perhaps the laureate of the turned head, the back of the neck, the side profile, the silhouette. Such a perspective lends further weight to the sense of a singular vision that haunts so many of images – the camera as omniscient observer, the eye that looks at the lookers, the visual energy of its lens charged not with the intimacy of experience but rather the composition of observation. The unchoreographed reciprocal gaze is a rare occurrence in a my photograph. More commonly the register of the image is one of the subject having been caught (or perhaps, more accurately, taken) while unaware of the action. More recently this tone of surreptitious observation has been strengthened by use of a telephoto lens. Where once expressions were obscured by looking away, now they are obscured by distance. The camera retreats, and in doing so the communal pattern dominates – Girls in bikini on beach, Waking on beach. day trippers scattered across a shore.

Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Newgale beach Pembrokeshire Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Newgale beach Pembrokeshire Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Dale Sea Safaris day trippers scattered across a shore. Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Dale Sea Safaris day trippers scattered across a shore. Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

“I love things that are ephemeral, things that are changing. As a photographer my job is to understand the way the world is changing and to document that” – Hardeep Singh

Hardeep Singh The Blue Lagoon, Abereiddi Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh The Blue Lagoon, Abereiddi Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh The Imperial College London Cross Country and Athletics Club Summer Trip to Colwyn Bay Wales GB Oct 2018. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh The Imperial College London Cross Country and Athletics Club Summer Trip to Colwyn Bay Wales GB Oct 2018. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh The Imperial College London Cross Country and Athletics Club Summer Trip to Colwyn Bay Wales GB Oct 2018. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh The Imperial College London Cross Country and Athletics Club Summer Trip to Colwyn Bay Wales GB Oct 2018. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

Move indoors, however, and the human suddenly seems more at home. This, in the world of My, appears to be our more natural habitat. The miner’s Workout, The Imperial College London Cross Country and Athletics club, the practicing cooking, Legs come into view and focus. The pictures come to life, the group dynamic energising the frame. Somehow, however, still manages to sustain the effect of the outsider on the inside, a still point at the eye of the human storm.

Hardeep Singh Tourist in Skomer Island Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Tourist in Skomer Island Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

I’ve photographed in Wales, England, Scotland, and they all have their minor differences, but in the end I see them all just as parts of the UK. – Hardeep Singh

I am not  looking for Wales in these images. I have made no attempt to visualise its unique linguistic character, or to capture its natural beauty, its grinding poverty, its split and conflicted personality as an ancient yet new nation, its recent journey towards and through devolution. None of this. What I have done, is to use Wales as my canvas, my backdrop for a longer, more personal ongoing search comprised of questions about who we are as modern humans moving within the patterns of our lives, our societies, our landscapes and our wildlife.

Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Rhossili Bay Wales GB July 2019. © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

 

I don’t think it really matters what you’re photographing. Photographing is about composition and communication. -Hardeep Singh

Diolch (Thank you)

 

 

 

Hardeep Singh: Think of Hebrides

Travel

From Scotch whisky to the desolate beauty of the remote Scottish Islands, If I could only go to one more Place, One more time, it would be back to Outer Hebrides.

Hardeep Singh On the west coast Scotland there’s a small town called Oban be careful….. “YOU MAY FALL IN LOVE”. Oban Ferry Terminal GB. 2014 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh On the west coast Scotland there’s a small town called Oban be careful…..
“YOU MAY FALL IN LOVE”. Oban Ferry Terminal GB. 2014 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

 On the west coast Scotland there’s a small town called Oban be careful…..  “YOU MAY FALL IN LOVE”.

“I love clichés,” As a Photographer. It’s a lifestyle that I live and breathe. Though perhaps it’s also a mixture of passion and obsession. There’s an insatiable desire in me to explore with the camera in hand.

Hardeep Singh On the west coast Scotland, Ferry to Outer Hebrides. GB. 2014 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh On the west coast Scotland, Ferry to Outer Hebrides. GB. 2014 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

To try and capture a fleeting movement that encapsulates the soul of that place.

“All the things you would expect to see in Scotland: Highland games, the kilt, Scottish dancing, the food. All the things you associate with Scotland in terms of clichés are things that I like” Hardeep Singh

For over 7 years, I have been taking photographs in Scotland. From the streets of Glasgow to an island agricultural show in Orkney, I have built a huge archive of photographs. This body of work–my largest previously unpublished archive – weaves together some of the expected visual iconography of Scotland, such as Outer Hebrides wildlife stunning landscapes, but all with my twist that makes the expected look so unfamiliar.

On the lure that keeps calling me back to the country, Hebrides the beauty of some areas – and the energy of others – so different from my usual surroundings is at the core of the appeal. “Firstly, it’s a very beautiful country, and second the people are great – very friendly, the social scene is very interesting, It’s different from where I live in London, it’s rougher and more engaging and quite dramatic. That difference really appeals to me.

Hardeep Singh Isle of North Uist, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Isle of North Uist, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Isle of North Uist, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Isle of Lewis, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

I just love the process of discovering and photographing new places. I expect to keep doing this forever, I can’t really imagine stopping.

IT’S WHAT I LOVE, IT’S WHO I AM.
Hardeep Singh

As tourist myself, making much of my work at attractions that pull in visitors, I also turns my lens to the tourists myself. I’ve always been fascinated by tourism, People come to Scotland with various tourism ideas, which I’ve photographed and given my own twists, like Surf in Isle of Lewis.

Hardeep Singh Surf Beach Lewis in Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Surf Beach Lewis in Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks From the nearby Butt of Lewis you can look out across the unforgiving waters of the Atlantic towards the uninhabited islands where his works were performed, and stand in the shadow of a unique Stevenson lighthouse built of red brick and standing sentinel over the island’s northernmost point, surrounded by the swells of an ever-surging sea. A coastal path is signposted from here to the nearby settlement at Dell – offering a great opportunity to really experience the area’s stunning sea- and skyscapes.
Hardeep Singh Surf Beach Lewis in Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Surf Beach Lewis in Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks At the northern tip of the Isle of Lewis lies the parish of Ness, offering a unique insight into the legends, lore and long-observed traditions that have shaped the island’s unique identity – as well as being a stronghold of the Gaelic language with a large majority of locals claiming Gaelic as their mother tongue.
Hardeep Singh Surf Beach Lewis in Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks Above the beach is a very poignant memorial to the 12 fishermen all from Eoropie who were lost when their two boats were wrecked here on March 5th 1855.
Hardeep Singh Surf Beach Lewis in Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Above the beach is a very poignant memorial to the 12 fishermen all from Eoropie who were lost when their two boats were wrecked here on March 5th 1855.

I have seen some amazing country and spent time with very special people. I hope that I’ve documented is not only important for the people who are in it, But for the nation.
Hardeep Singh

Hardeep Singh Isle of North Uist, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks
Hardeep Singh Isle of North Uist, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks

For Me, this offers the perfect opportunity to engage in one of my favourite activities: observing the cultural and social habits of people going about their ordinary lives. Part of the whole tourist scene there, is people with their smartphones, I am observes. That’s the main occupation people have when they get there is taking photos of themselves, their friends, their family, in front of every icon and every aspect of the tourist location. It’s an obsession.

Ever since I was a boy dreaming of destination around the world, the world has taught me, and photography has taught me to capture every creature as it it’s the last, to treat every moment as fleeting our plant move on, it evolves, it change, and tomorrow is always going to bring me something new.
If my images can influence just a few more people to care for the nature of our world, the I feel like I’ve done my part.
Hardeep Singh

 Hardeep Singh Butt of Lewis Lighthouse in Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland, GB. 2017 © Hardeep Singh | Harry Clicks Built in 1862 by David and Thomas Stevenson. Made from red brick, which was unusual for Scottish lighthouses, it is 37 metres high and has 168 steps to the top. Spray flies over the top of it in winter storms. It was one of the last lighthouses to be automated in 1998.

‘It’s eerie’: Capturing the emptiness of London, a city under lockdown

In the nearly decades I’ve lived and worked in London, I’ve never seen it this quiet. It’s an eerie, empty quiet.

As spring blooms, some of the most famous landmarks in the City of Lights are off-limits.

At first, it took time for people to understand what was happening, that this new coronavirus was much more than an Asian crisis. Schools are closed on March 19— cafes, restaurants and pubs will be closed in a bid to halt the spread of coronavirus and yet on the following weekend, spring was in the air, it was sunny and beautiful, and LONDONERS couldn’t resist going outdoors.

 

Two days after the order for people to stay home, Knightsbridge, the business district of London, was deserted.

Then on 23 March , the full meaning came clear when President Boris Johnson ordered the entire country to stay at home for 3 weeks, starting at noon the next day. That morning, a line 200 yards long formed outside my supermarket. As I photographed the line, a few customers objected. But after we talked, I understood that they were just scared, and some were upset with the government for not seeing the crisis coming sooner.

 

Coronavirus closures: Shopping malls in Des Moines metro cut hours while some stores shut down
Coronavirus closures: Shopping malls and luxury Store in the UK cut hours while some stores shut down

The first time I covered something bad happening at Glastonbury Festival Campers woke up to Brexit and the EU referendum clash was in 2016, when I photographed the aftermath of the 2016 June 23 on a Compared to that, my work during this COVID calamity is so different. It’s about all of us—strangers, friends, my family, my neighbour’s, me.

The luxury London store Harrods, which stayed open throughout the bombing of the capital during World War II, announced on 20 March it was closing its doors., in the centre of London, is one of the largest commercial malls in Europe. Now it’s abandoned, with the only sounds the clatter of escalators—and the singing of birds.
The luxury London store Harrods, which stayed open throughout the bombing of the capital during World War II, announced on 20 March it was closing its doors., in the centre of London, is one of the largest commercial malls in Europe. Now it’s abandoned, with the only sounds the clatter of escalators—and the singing of birds.

In these poor neighbourhoods, where life can be a struggle on an average day, fights have erupted between young men, and the local markets have all closed. I consider myself lucky—for poor families stuck in small apartments, it’s much harder.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): what you need to do  , Only go outside for food, health reasons or work (but only if you cannot work from home)

When France’s ordeal began, London was still packed and bustling with people, and New York City was too. I think Paris was one of the first big, famous cities to empty out. By 1 April 2020, Nationwide, United Kingdom had 29,474 reported positive cases, 2352 had died and 135 recovered. Many here assume the actual number of cases must be much higher because we’re testing only people with severe symptoms.

Two weeks after the city’s bars, cafés, and other non-essential businesses were closed, If you go out, stay 2 metres (6ft) away from other people at all times

In familiar settings I have to find beauty and meaning in something I see every day, and I’m so used to what’s around me that I may miss interesting scenes or moments. In the city centre now, I see so many homeless people I hadn’t noticed before when they were hidden among the daily crowds. Their situation is terrible. They can’t plead with passers-by for money because the streets are empty. All the public toilets they usually use are closed.

Do not meet others, even friends or family. You can spread the virus even if you don’t have symptoms.
Do not meet others, even friends or family. You can spread the virus even if you don’t have symptoms.
With flights being cancelled around the world, the train from the city centre to Heathrow Airport is a ghost ship.

I want to show how the pandemic is affecting the homeless, as well as immigrants. For them, social distancing is impossible. They have no access to masks and gloves, and maintaining strict personal hygiene is difficult. I’m also planning to rephotograph from TV, Newspaper, Instagram portrait famous people with coronavirus or quarantine and watching people through my window during London Lockdown.

Coronavirus: 10 Transport for London workers die after testing positive Eight were bus workers, one working for Transport for London and another working for London Underground
Coronavirus: 10 Transport for London workers die after testing positive Eight were bus workers, one working for Transport for London and another working for London Underground  (Earl’s Court Station I’ve never seen it this quiet. It’s an eerie, empty quiet).
Police patrol the empty during Covid-19 London
Police patrol the empty Trafalgar Square on 23 March 2020, the first day of the lockdown in London. Before leaving their homes, Londoner are supposed to show authorities a Only go outside for food, health reasons or work, Those without one risk a fine.
A lone One person on daily walk  the lockdown on the National Gallery
A lone One person on daily walk the lockdown on the National Gallery. The lockdown Maybe extend to end of April as the COVID-19 death toll rises.

In some ways, it’s more difficult to shoot your own place and people. One thing I’ve wanted to do is convey the mood of the city’s most iconic structures as they appear under lockdown—the National Gallery and  the business district Bank—at different times, in different lights. It’s very hard to photograph emptiness. I’ve been spending a lot of time—sometimes three hours or more—at each site. In all, I must have shot at least 4,000 frames by now.

I intend to continue this work over the next few weeks, to give the world’s people at least one view of the pandemic in my city. As I’ve roamed London, I’ve noticed that the air is much fresher—there’s less pollution. —And one day when I was shooting at the main entrance of the National Gallery, I heard birds singing. I’d never realised there were birds at city Centre of all places. It gave me hope.